Talking to Americans, the Power of Lux & Canada’s shame

In today’s installment of Sunday: At the movies with On Deadline, we have some comedy, some pensive education clips and a little media absorption exercise to a wonderful piece of music. Kick back, find some time and enjoy.

TALKING TO AMERICANS – courtesy of Rick Mercer

Ok, so some Canadian visitors will get a hoot from these clips of Rick Mercer’s infamous “Talking to Americans” series. Yes, some of things Mercer asks Americans are slightly unfair but it is the common sense questions that really deliver the comedy. Canada finally legalizes staplers? Canada completing the chunnel to China? Canada gets a second area code?An American governor congratulates Canada on preserving its national igloo?

THE POWER OF LUX AETERNA

The following is as much about viewing as it is about hearing. Lux Aeterna is a powerful and enchanting arrangement by Clint Mansell for the movie Requiem for a Dream. The two videos in the segment can be a fine example of what adding visuals can do to move someone and effect how they absorb an experience.

This first clip has a simple black backdrop with the full six-minute version of the song. If you have never hear it, give it a listen in its entirety and see if it moves you like it seems to do to everyone else.

The second clip is a four minute version of the song played to some strong Second World War footage. The piece is already moving but look and see what the images do to your media absorption experience.

 

A LOST HERITAGE: CANADA’S RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS – courtesy of CBC Archives

http://archives.cbc.ca/society/education/topics/692/

Hard to believe it happened in Canada. First Nations children, some ripped from their homes, then forced into government organized residential schools to prepare them for life in a “white society”. This shameful part of our Canadian history only happened 50 years.  On Deadline has blogged before on this issue as well.

The CBC archives on this matter are a good starting point if you want to learn more about this time in Canadian history.

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